Cecília Széll


Cecília Széll
Photographer: Zoltán Vancsó
Opera singer
Born in Budapest, Cecília Széll earned her diploma at Eötvös Loránd University, where she studied voice, music and conducting. She continued her solo vocal training with Ilona Adorján, and later with Éva Lax. She has been a frequent participant in master classes held by Anna Reynolds and Nicholas Clapton, and is currently studying with Erika Markovics. As a member of the Hungarian National Philharmonic since 2000, she makes frequent appearances as a soloist at Müpa Budapest. In 2007, she won the “Singer of the Year” award for her outstanding artistic accomplishments. Although she appears most frequently with the National Philharmonic, she has also collaborated as a soloist with the MÁV Symphony Orchestra, the Danubia Orchestra Óbuda, the Orfeo Orchestra, the Pannon Philharmonic, and the symphony orchestras of Eger and Miskolc. She has worked with many outstanding conductors, including Zoltán Kocsis, Mátyás Antal, Zsolt Hamar, Csaba Somos, János Bali, György Vashegyi, Howard Williams, László Tardy, Gergely Vajda, László Kovács, Imre Kollár, Csaba Tőri and Gergely Dubóczky. Her operatic roles include The Fire, The Princess and The Nightingale (in a performance of Ravel's L'enfant et les stortilèges that was recorded for television with Zoltán Kocsis conducting), the Harmony Fairy (in György Ránki's The Adventures of Peter the Musician in Instrument Land), Clorinda (La Cenerentola), Blonde and Konstanze (Die Entführung aus dem Seraglio, making her Hungarian State Opera House debut in the latter role in 2016), Papagena (Die Zauberflöte), as well as appearing in Le grand macabre. She has sung in oratorios at noted festivals, concert halls and theatres around Hungary. Along with well-known works by Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Orff, Honegger and Kodály, her repertoire includes pieces by Ottó Vincze, Mór Vavrinecz and Mátyás Seiber. She has participated in the Hungarian premieres of several works: György Orbán's Missa Terzia (2001), Michael Tippett's A Child of Our Time (2005) and Gyula Csapó's Requiem (2016).